Logica

One small step for fashion, one potentially giant leap for sustainability

Friday, May 25th, 2012 | Our Philosophy | No Comments

This blog post originally appeared on Melba Foggo’s Logica blog

In the crucial battle for the hearts and minds of trendsetters, the fashion industry is better placed than any other to encourage consumers to be greener.

In recent times it’s been heartening to see a number of major brands taking great strides to becoming more sustainable. Nike, Levi’s, Timberland, North Face, Gucci, YSL and Puma have all made efforts to reduce the environmental impact of their products.

But what stops them from going further? A common theme among high-street brands we’ve spoken to at Global Cool is fear of putting their heads above the green parapet. There is no shortage of will to make supply chains more sustainable, to create greener production processes and even to educate staff on environmental issues; but when we’ve suggested that they could use their influence with consumers to make an even more significant difference in the fight against climate change, we’ve been met with looks of horror.

That’s why the launch of H&M’s Conscious Collection last month feels like an important step. Of course, there is no shortage of places for the ethically aware consumer can go to get their fashion fix: sites like Fashion Conscience, Annie Greenabelle, People Tree and THTC (which has featured in Logica’s Sustainability Stories series ) have all played an important role in showing bigger brands that sustainable fashion can be both aspirational and profitable.

The Conscious Collection – all the garments are made from organic cotton, hemp and recycled polyester – is a rare attempt by the high street to take ethical fashion to the masses. Crucially, as well as being sustainable, this line is affordable for the average customer and, because it comes with the full weight of the H&M brand behind it (including celebrity endorsers like the Hollywood actress Michelle Williams), it ‘s been well received in mainstream media. Even the Daily Mail, a newspaper not usually known for its support of climate change, gave the launch a positive review.

That’s not to say H&M and other fashion brands do not have their detractors; there were no shortage of people queuing up to point out the fashion industry’s shortcomings around labour rights on the The Guardian’s coverage.

Clearly this kind of scrutiny is important to ensure that the fashion industry lives up to its environmental claims, especially as a recent survey found 52% of consumers are skeptical about brands’ ethical claims.

Less helpful, though, are those detractors who argue that the word sustainability is incompatible with an industry whose lifeblood is the creation of new trends that ensure the old trends have a very short shelf life. Not only is this attitude defeatist, it also fosters the kind of fear of criticism that has held brands back from being bolder in their sustainability initiatives.

Of course, there is still a lot more that fashion brands can do – not least making their entire range sustainable. Marketing Week also pointed out that H&M could do more to promote sustainability by making their customers feel good about buying these products. At Global Cool we think they have a part to play in encouraging wider green behaviours, too, such as efficient home energy use. But this is certainly a step in the right direction and one that we hope many more fashion brands will follow.

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How to make sustainability desirable

Wednesday, April 25th, 2012 | Our Philosophy | No Comments

This blog post originally appeared on Melba Foggo’s Logica blog

With the Sustainability Stories campaign currently in full swing, now is an apt time to be writing our first guest blog for Logica.

Global Cool has worked closely with Logica over the last couple of years. In late 2011 and early 2012 they helped us redefine our business strategy and develop the B2B content services that are now helping to fund our main consumer-facing work. Melba Foggo, Logica’s International Practice Leader for Sustainability Services, is also Treasurer and a Trustee of Global Cool Foundation, which runs the Global Cool campaign.

So, Global Cool has certainly benefited from the expertise Logica is offering as the prize for the Sustainability Stories competition. We are also an example of the kind of innovation that Sustainability Stories is championing.

Global Cool has pioneered a unique approach to tackling climate change. Launched in 2007 with backing from Tony Blair, Prince Charles and celebrities such as Leonardo Di Caprio, Sienna Miller, Josh Hartnett and many more, our mission is to reach people traditionally turned off by climate change campaigns. Over the last five years we have worked with Vodafone, London Fashion Week, Britain’s Next Top Model Live, London Fashion and a host of music festivals to promote sustainable living to the mainstream.

Over the last 30 years the green movement has done a great job of mobilising people who have an intrinsic desire to ‘do their bit’, but it has largely failed to engage people whose values and priorities lie elsewhere. Global Cool was created to fix that problem. We target society’s trendsetters, who are at the tipping point of normalising behaviours and attitudes. Without buy-in from the mainstream it will be impossible to generate the social, economic and political will needed to combat climate change.

The Global Cool team has its roots in mainstream mass media, so we understand how to communicate with trendsetters. We have also done extensive research with market segmentation experts Cultural Dynamics to understand how trendsetters think. We know that they don’t like being told what to do and are turned off by scare tactics or apocalyptic visions of impending disaster. Perhaps most surprisingly for those who find themselves compelled to fight climate change, we also know trendsetters do not respond to rational, science-based arguments. Sorry, Al Gore, but all the graphs and data in the world are not going to make any difference. Nor are they are relevant; most trendsetters already believe in climate change, they just don’t feel empowered or motivated to do anything about it. Climate change does not have an awareness problem, but its solutions do have a marketing one.

Global Cool is solving that marketing problem by inspiring people into action rather than scaring them. We focus on specific, day-to-day behaviours that people can easily adopt rather than visions of melting ice caps that feel like a million miles from the real world to most people. Behaviours we promote include turning down home heating, flight-free holidays, cycling and public transport (an area that Logica has worked in with its work in Helsinki ). We highlight the benefits of these green behaviours and connect them to things trendsetters do care about, such as fashion, music, travel adventures and lifestyle trends.

Our Turn Up The Style, Turn Down The Heat campaign encourages people to wear on-trend knitwear around the home so they can turn down their heating and use less energy. By centring the campaign on fashion we make green behaviours fun and positive which in turn makes them desirable to people who are unlikely to turn down their heating because they think it will save a polar bear.

More than 211,000 people visited our lifestlye website last year and our research shows that 80% of our audience can be identified as trendsetters – or what Cultural Dynamics define as ‘Now People’ in their values modes theory. We have also shown that we can get people to change their behaviour, with a 50% increase in the number of people willing to Turn Up The Style, Turn Down The Heat before and after the campaign.

As well as making sustainability cool, we also believe in making it easy, and that’s why we were delighted to see Logica supporting sustainable projects that are empowering people to make a real difference. Sustainability Stories is giving a voice to innovative sustainability and showing that a sustainable future can enrich all of our lives through positive change.

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We run Global Cool, the only online magazine in the UK truly inspiring the mainstream to live greener

We create content about music, fashion, celebrity and lifestyle trends. We use this content to inspire people normally turned off by climate change to lead greener lives. We reached more than 200,000 people in 2011 and we don't preach to the converted. In fact, 93% of our audience say we are the only green organisation they engage with.

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